Tag Archives: Emily Blunt

Edge of Tomorrow: Crap Title, Great Blockbuster!

ALL YOU NEED IS KILL

What would you get if you blended Groundhog Day with military sci-fi of the alien invasion variety? First you’d get the Japanese novel, All You Need is Kill, then you’d get the westernized Tom Cruise vehicle, Edge of Tomorrow (which would have kept its unique, imaginative, original title instead of its current, homogenized one if the movie wasn’t PG-rated).

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Time Loop Trailer: Edge of Tomorrow!

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Warner Brothers and village Roadshow have released an extended trailer for Edge of Tomorrow – the Doug Liman/Tom Cruise/Emily Blunt movie that combines military sci-fi with Groundhog Day to create an unusually rich spectacle. It contains a ton of new footage and looks amazing.

Check it out after the jump. Edge of Tomorrow marches into theaters on June 6th.

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Edge of Tomorrow Trailer: Train. Kill. Die. Repeat.

edge-of-tomorrow-1

Warner Brothers has released the first trailer for the new Tom Cruise action movie, Edge of Tomorrow. Lt. Col. Bill Cage (Cruise), who has never seen a day of battle, finds himself dropped into a crucial battle against an invading alien force. He dies. Then, somehow, he’s back, in a time loop – and aware of what’s happening. But he’s not alone – Special Forces warrior Rita Vrataski (Emily Blunt) is also in the loop and undertakes training him.

Think of it as Groundhog Day on a battlefield – but the piano teacher is in the loop and it’s directed by Doug Liman (The Bourne Identity, Mr. & Mrs. Smith). Edge of Tomorrow is in theaters on June 6, 2014. Check out the trailer after the jump.

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The 5-Year Engagement Works – It Just Tries Too Hard Sometimes!

Violet (EMILY BLUNT) and Tom (JASON SEGEL) keep getting tripped up on the long walk down the aisle in "The Five-Year Engagement", the new irreverent comedy that reteams the director and writer/star of "Forgetting Sarah Marshall".

Tom Solomon and Violet Barnes may be perfect for each other. They get each other so well that he knows the perfect engagement ring for her [not the expected big honkin’ diamond…] and she understands his sense of humor. Unfortunately, once they get engaged – and despite their best, most enthusiastic efforts, nothing seems to go right.

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MOVIE REVIEW: Sunshine Cleaning: Making Things Just a Little Bit Better

Sunshine Cleaning, which opened wide this weekend, is a quirky, entertaining dramedy that mines the same kind of vibe that propelled Little Miss Sunshine to hit status. It’s about pursuing a dream even though it would have appeared that it was too late. It features a very familiar performance from Alan Arkin as Joe, the eccentric father to sisters Rose [Amy Adams] and Norah [Emily Blunt], and grandfather to Rose’s equally eccentric young son, Oscar [Jason Spevak].

(Left to right.) Amy Adams and Emily Blunt star in Overture Films' Sunshine Cleaning.

Rose works for a home cleaning company [a kind of maids-on-wheels gig], but was once the captain of the cheerleading squad and girlfriend of the quarterback. She’s still the girlfriend of the quarterback, Mac [Steve Zahn], a married police detective], but that’s the only thing her life has in common with her younger self. This is not where she thought she’d be – something that being invited to a baby shower for a former fellow cheerleader drives home.

Norah was probably the class clown until she dropped out and began a series of wage-slave jobs. Where Norah is responsible and maybe more than a bit worn down, Norah still acts like she’s in high school. We meet her as she gets fired from yet another job.

When Mac suggests that Rose get involved the lucrative crime scene cleanup game, she takes the idea and runs with it – dragging Norah along with her. Working together has opposite effects on the sisters: Rose really gets into it, learning everything she can about the job – and excelling at it [plus, she believes it makes things better in some small way]; Norah, who really needs a handler at all times, is easily distracted and not really interested – a combination that brings about some really bad results. Since Rose needs the money to get Oscar into a private school, where he can get the kind of attention an eccentric kid like him needs, this drives a huge wedge between her and Norah. Meanwhile, Joe is trying various get-rich-quick schemes with little to no success.

Sunshine Cleaning is not the next Little Miss Sunshine, but that’s okay. It is a witty dramedy that gives us interesting characters who react to their circumstances in very real ways. The script, by Megan Holley, is rich enough in terms of both characters and situation that it feels real and we can easily relate to them. Director Christine Jeffs draws a solid performance from her cast, but I doubt that Amy Adams and Emily Blunt are even capable of turning a bad performance. Where Jeffs’ skill shows, is in her work with young Jason Spevak. Oscar could have been just another precocious kid, but he’s not – in a world of precocious kid actors, Spevak is intriguingly fresh. He cloaks his character’s intelligence within his eccentricities in a way that really does make Oscar unique.

If Sunshine Cleaning doesn’t quite hit all the heights to which it aspires, it still has enough wit and intelligence and warmth to balance its darker moments [and there are a number of them, right from the fade in]. It is a solid, entertaining film.

Final Grade: B+