Tag Archives: Isla Fisher

Clean Up Your Act Trailer: The Beach Bum!

Matthew McConaughey stars as Moondog in Harmony Korine’s new comedy,The Beach Bum. He’s a free spirit who lives for a good time – sometimes at the expense of not necessarily keeping to the law.

The new trailer for The Beach Bum shows Moondog’s life of excess – and a judge warning him to straighten out or face jail time (which he seemingly ignores).

The Beach Bum will be in theaters on March 29th.

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Moondog’s from Another Dimension Trailer: The Beach Bum!

The Beach Bum – Moondog (Matthew McConaughey) – Photo courtesy of NEON.

In Harmony Korine’s The Beach Bum, Matthew McConaughey may have found his Dude – Moondog, the titular Moondog is a beach bum who plays bongos and is described as being ‘from another dimension).

The Beach Bum will be in theaters on March 22, 2019.

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You’re It! Trailer: Tag!

For one month every year, five highly competitive friends hit the ground running in a no-holds-barred game of tag they’ve been playing since the first grade—risking their necks, their jobs and their relationships to take each other down with the battle cry: “You’re It!”

This year, the game coincides with the wedding of their only undefeated player, which should finally make him an easy target. But he knows they’re coming… and he’s ready. Based on a true story, the New Line Cinema comedy Tag shows how far some guys will go to be the last man standing.

Tag will be in theaters on June 15th.

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Now You See It: The Opening Sequence!

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Summit Entertainment’s Now You See Me is one of the most intriguing movies of the summer, what with its blend of illusions and heists. After two terrific trailers, the movie’s opening sequence has been released online. It’s a clever introduction to the main characters and definitely draws us into the movie.

Check it out after the jump.

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DVD Review: Rise of the Guardians – 2012’s Best Animated Feature Comes to Home Video!

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Rise of the Guardians was the best animated feature of 2012 – no matter what the Academy might have thought. It’s smart enough for older kids-at-heart and filled with lots of action and cool stuff to engage younger viewers. That it didn’t even get an Oscar® nomination is sad, but that won’t matter to most of its audience – and the Spring Gift Pack DVD release also features some cool video features, a nifty toy and some cool DIY stuff in its DVD-ROM content.

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Rango DVD Yields Unexpected Wonderfulness!

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After first encountering Rango’s brilliance in 3D, I was pleased to discover that the 2D version on the DVD makes up for the loss of that extra dimension by being bright, sharp and gorgeous. An unexpected plus was the inclusion of an extra feature that’s not listed on the cover – two, if you include an extended version of the film.

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MOVIE REVIEW: Confessions of a Shopaholic and The Accidental Metaphor!

Even though it was filmed before the global economy went south, Confessions of a Shopaholic is – however accidentally – definitely a metaphor for the recession on a personal level – and Jerry Bruckheimer’s anti-Bruckheimer film [the only explosions are those of an emotional nature] is a solid romantic comedy that nears, but doesn’t quite reach, screwball proportions.

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Rebecca Bloomwood [Isla Fisher] loves to shop. When she shops, the world seems better, brighter somehow. Unfortunately, that feeling wears off and she has to shop again. Her life becomes complicated by a series of events: she loses her job; someone named Derek Smeath [Robert Stanton] is hounding her for payment on one of her twelve credit cards]; and she has to, somehow, feign glee at the bridesmaid dress she must wear to her best friend and roommate’s wedding.

A chance encounter at a hot dog vendor gives her her first lesson in finance and features a “meet cute” with Luke Brandon [Hugh Dancy], who will turn out to be very important in her transformation from credit goose to worthwhile swan. Brandon’s Successful Saving magazine will be Rebecca’s first stop on the journey from unemployment to celebrated columnist for the ultimate fashion magazine, Alette. Surprisingly, she turns out to have a knack for putting financial concepts into metaphors that make the subject fun – boosting Successful Saving’s impact, prestige and [it would seem] circulation.

At first, nothing seems to be able to stop Rebecca from shopping – not even attending Shopaholics Anonymous meetings. Like the money men on Wall Street, who kept spending as indicators grew telling them to stop, Rebecca carries on – until she gets precisely what she deserves in the most inconvenient manner possible. It’s here that the metaphor splinters a bit – because, even as we wait for the Wall Street folks to become responsible, Rebecca does indeed learn her lesson [the hows and whys of which you will not learn here].

There are two main plotlines to Confessions: Rebecca’s having to deal with her finances and the girl-meets-boy, girl-screws-things-up-with-boy, girl-gets-boy plot. For Confessions, the surprises don’t arise from the results as much as they do from the events that take place along the way [as when Rebecca has to decide between a stylish dress for a TV appearance and her bridesmaid’s dress].

The script [by Tracey Jackson, Tim Firth and Kayla Alpert] is light and breezy, for the most part, but knows just when to hit an emotional note. P.J. Hogan’s [Muriel’s Wedding] direction is best described as deft. He has a good instinct not just for laughs, but for secondary and even tertiary bits that support rather than detract from the film – and he gets just the right performances from his cast.

Speaking of the cast: Isla Fisher is marvelous as Rebecca; Hugh Dancy is the second coming of Hugh Grant as Luke, and Krysten Ritter is delightfully odd as Rebecca’s best friend, Suze. John Goodman and Joan Cusack are equally terrific as Rebecca’s supportive parents, and the members of the Shopaholics Anonymous group more than hold up their sections of the film – especially ex-NBA star John Salley’s D. Freak, and Wendy Malik’s [Just Shoot Me] Miss Korch.

Confessions of a Shopaholic may have started out as a standard, if well done, romantic comedy but has become – however inadvertently – a metaphor. It succeeds on both levels. Admirably.

Final Grade: B+