Tag Archives: Edward Norton

Isle of Dogs – Animation Featurette!

Isle of Dogs – (L-R): Boss (Bill Murray), Duke (Jeff Goldblum), Rex (Edward Norton), King (Bob Balaban), Spots (Liev Shreiber, Gondo (Harvey Keitel), Atari Kobyashi (Koyu Rankin and Chief (Bryan Cranston) – Photo Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Fox Searchlight, has released a new featurette for Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs. This behind the scenes look shows how a unique team of 25 animators and 10 assistants brought Wes Anderson’s vision to life.

Isle of Dogs premieres in select theaters on Friday, March 23rd!

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Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance): A Fabulous Fiction Rooted In Truth!

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Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) is a brilliant bombastic, bizarre skewering of: superhero movies, egocentric actors, actors’ insecurities, Broadway, Broadway critics, and pretty much all things entertainment.

The story of Riggan Thomson’s (Michael Keaton) effort to be taken seriously as an actor/director/playwright after having starred in three superhero movies twenty years ago – Birdman is directed as a continuous shot (which is difficult because the film takes place over a considerably longer period that its two-hour running time).

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Insane Trailer: Alejandro Iñárritu’s Birdman!

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A actor struggles to mount a play on Broadway. Normal, right? Broadway is never easy. But this actor was once a movie god, playing the iconic superhero, Birdman. Combined with his ego problems, troubled family life and fading career, that’s a lot to put on any guy’s plate.

Is he nuts? The new international trailer for Alejandro Iñárritu’s Birdman suggests that might be a possibility. Check it out after the jump.

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First Teaser: Birdman!

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In Birdman, Michael Keaton plays a man who was once famous for playing an iconic superhero. Nothing he’s done before or since has impacted that fame and he’s pretty much considered washed up – but now he’s trying to mount a Broadway play and must overcome his ego, family troubles and, of course, the fact that everyone thinks of him as Birdman, to make it work.

Birdman is the next film from Alejandro González Iñárritu (Babel, Biutiful). Check out the first teaser after the jump.

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MOVIE REVIEW: The Incredible Hulk: This Time Hulk Smash! By Sheldon Wiebe

Ang Lee’s Hulk, the A Beautiful Mind take, left fans cold, so now we have Louis Leterrier’s “HULK SMASH!” version – and it does indeed rock the house. The script – solely credited to Zak Penn [suggesting that the parts star Edward Norton worked on were edited out] – gives us all kinds of neat stuff to watch: Bruce Banner [Norton] working on Brazilian martial arts techniques to maintain his calm; a graphic that pops up every so often to remind us that it’s been x days since his last Hulk-out; a kind of spiffy pair of references to Captain America [including a shield!]; a brief appearance by Dr. Leonard Sampson; a hint that the Hulk’s smartest arch-enemy might be waiting in the wings if a sequel is warranted, and lots more.

The question is, does the movie work? Well, yeah, it does. The only real problem with the film is that it has been edited to be almost the exact opposite of the Lee film – almost all action, with a small amount of character development. A lot of critics will probably tell you the film is humourless, too, but watch for what has to be Stan Lee’s best cameo ever and see what you think. There’s even just enough romance to remind people that Banner had a serious relationship before he become the Jekyll/Hyde being that he is.

Hulk Not Like Little Man

The plot here is pretty much the basic Hulk comics plot: Banner doesn’t want to become the Hulk but people won’t leave him – with predictable and dire results. The fun is in setting the film is real locales [the chase through the Brazilian favella might remind of Jason Bourne, but it’s nifty in its own way] and in using the Banner character to show two of the basic conflicts in fiction: Man vs. Himself; Man vs. The Environment, and Man vs. Man. Banner’s struggle against his primal self is there, just as in the comics, as is his struggle with the U.S. Army – personified by General Thunderbolt Ross [William Hurt] and Emil Blonsky [Tim Roth]. A case could be made that the climactic battle between Hulk and the Abomination could also represent Man vs. The Environment [or misuse of same], but we’ll forego that one.

Louis Leterrier’s The Incredible Hulk loses the comic affectations of Lee’s film – there are no shots composed to resemble comic book panels – but retains the emotional core [however little screen time it might get] and powers forth the action. By the time Hulk and the Abomination clash, they are characters and not merely CG constructs. Leterrier’s direction is as swift as merciless as Emil Blonsky, and a whole ‘nother level beyond what he achieved in his Transporter films.

Perhaps, if there were more character moments [not many, but the inclusion of the Banner-Samson chat from the first trailer would’ve been nice] the film would resonate better, but this time, it’s all about the fun – and The Incredible Hulk is definitely that!

Final Grade: B+