Tag Archives: Peter Berg

Battleship – Just Seen It Movie Review


Aliens invade earth after receiving a signal from NASA. But the crew of the John Paul Jones and their comrades engage the attackers in a vicious sea battle. So the Americans and Japanese navies join forces in a fight for the survival of the human race.

Starring Taylor Kitsch, Alexander Skarsgård, Brooklyn Decker, Rihanna, and Liam Neeson.
Directed by Peter Berg.
Written by Erich Hoeber and Jon Hoeber.
Produced by Sarah Aubrey, Peter Berg, Brian Goldner, Duncan Henderson, and Bennett Schneir.
Genre: Action Sci-Fi Thriller.
Check out all our reviews at www.justseenit.com

Michelle Loves Battleship!

Battleship Movie Review

As a visceral thing, the idea of making board games into Movies offends me on so many different levels. Its shows how creatively bankrupt Hollywood has become that they think that because people play a game like Life, Chutes and Ladders, or Monopoly that somehow there is material there for a movie.  When I heard there was a Battleship movie, based on the Hasbro game, I was not enthused. Then I saw the first trailer and thought, hmm. Could this movie possibly be better than it has any right to be?

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Sneak Peek: NBC’s Prime Suspect – They Might Just Pull This Off!

Anyone who has seen Lynda LaPlante’s Prime Suspect might wonder how NBC, an American broadcast network, could possibly pull off an adaptation where there could be no nudity, no cussing and considerably less all-around nastiness. To them , I need only saw two things: Homicide: Life on the Streets, and Peter Berg [Friday Night Lights – the movie and the TV series].

The Prime Suspect [NBC, Thursdays, 10/9C] trailer and other videos from nbc.com show a willingness to embrace the tone and intelligence of the original and Maria Bello definitely fits the role of Jane Timoney. Check out five more videos after the jump.

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Movie Review: The Losers Has All the Makings of A Box Office Winner

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Anyone Else Would Be Dead By Now: The Losers is a tale of double cross and revenge centered upon the members of an elite U.S. Special Forces unit sent into the Bolivian jungle on a search and destroy mission. The team-Clay, Jensen, Roque, Pooch and Cougar -find themselves the target of a lethal betrayal instigated from inside by a powerful enemy known only as Max. Presumed dead, the group makes plans to even the score when the mysterious Aisha, a beautiful operative with her own agenda, joins them. Working together, they must remain deep undercover while tracking the heavily guarded Max, a ruthless man bent on embroiling the world in a new high-tech global war.

That’s the official Warner Brothers synopsis for the movie The Losers, which stars among others, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Zoe Saldana, Chris Evans and Jason Patric. It is based on characters in a graphic novel created by Andy Diggle and illustrated by Jocko. I have to admit right now, I’ve never read the graphic novels and so going into the screening of this action movie I knew absolutely nothing about the story of these four men and the lovely, mysterious Aisha, other than they were being played by actors I enjoy seeing on screen and that they were on a mission of revenge. I came out of the screening not only wanting to immediately see The Losers again, but with high anticipation for the sequel that surely has to be forthcoming.

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MOVIE REVIEW: Hancock is Definitely Not Superman!

The trailers and clips released online for Hancock promise a superhero dramedy with an edge – and, for the first half of the film it delivers just that. Watching the drunken superhero get the bad guys while toting up millions of dollars in property damage is, at first, diverting and new. When he saves a PR whiz named Ray Embry [Jason Bateman], Bateman persuades him to change his image – first by doing jail time, second by treating people with more respect, and third by wearing a spiffy spandex outfit that looks like something out of the X-Men movies. Of course, being the rotten example that he is, before he can completely remake his image, Hancock develops the hots for Ray’s beautiful wife, Mary [Charlize Theron].

So far, so good. Hancock, in its first half, comes off as an effort to make a movie about the kind of hero that Marvel [Spider-Man, Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk] does so well – the hero with superpowers and regular people’s problems. But now, we come to Hancock’s kryptonite. Like Superman, Green Lantern and so many classic superheroes, Hancock does, indeed, have a weakness – a weakness that’s telegraphed by several clues scattered through the first half of the film.

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Therein lies the problem. After carefully setting up Hancock as one thing – a superhero – the revelation of his weakness changes everything, and not in the most sensible of ways. As I watched the clues develop, my first thought was, “oh, no. They wouldn’t…” Then, when it happened, I thought, “oh, no! They didn’t” – followed closely by, “golly-gosh-all-hemlock-gee-whiz-to-pieces! They did!” I won’t give the twist away, but I will say that, when you add up all the species of life and types of minerals there are on this planet, Hancock’s weakness is so hugely, disproportionately coincidental that, had it been used in a real comic book or graphic novel, the writer would’ve been laughed out of every comics shop in North America – just for starters!

As a result, the second half of Hancock is filled with mayhem of all sorts that, essentially, robs the film of the charm and wit that helped build up the first half. The shame of it all is that Smith, Bateman, and Theron give really good performances as the film disintegrates around them – and Peter Berg’s direction is precisely what it should be throughout. The problem with the script is that writers Vincent Ngo and Vince Gilligan seem to think that, because Hancock is a superhero movie, they can do anything they want. They’ve forgotten [if they ever even thought about it] that the best comics and graphic novels are set in universes that have rules – and adhere to them.

Sadly, the last half of Hancock, full of sound and fury as it is, totally undercuts the first half of the film’s effectiveness. In the end, Hancock may not be an average superhero, but his movie never reaches that level.

Final Grade: D+