Tag Archives: Kristin Kreuk

SMALLVILLE – A Special Episode #200 and on the Path to Making History!

 

Tonight, SMALLVILLE will reach a television milestone and continue on a course to science fiction history!  The very special episode #200, which finished filming in September, will air this evening at 8pm on The CW.  The cast and crew were celebrating this momentous milestone with a party at the end of September in Vancouver, at about the same time when the tenth season was premiering on our screens.  In terms of number of episodes, every set of ‘100’ represents approximately five years of imagination, dedication, and hard work.  And all the people involved with the series for the past nine years have definitely earned the right to celebrate.

This tenth season will also be the final one, despite the series continuing to show ongoing viewer support and creative growth.  From an artistic standpoint, having a specific end-date in sight will allow the creative team the opportunity to bring the storylines to a natural close as Clark Kent continues on his path to becoming The Man of Steel.  Ever since the first season in 2001, the producers have declared ‘no tights, no flights!’ referring to their desire to explore the early years of Clark Kent before he becomes the iconic hero known as Superman.  Despite several story directions, which found small loopholes around this decree, even earning the eye-rolling frustration of fans waiting for Clark to don the red and blue suit – or at least to jump a tall building in a single bound – the creative team stayed true to its word.  Until now.  This will be the season that Clark Kent makes the full transformation into Superman and the series is ready to pull out all the stops!

SMALLVILLE is also now set to make sci-fi history.  Up until this year, STARGATE SG1 has been the longest consecutively running live-action Sci-Fi series in North America, having aired 213 episodes.  This accomplishment has earned it a place in the Guinness Book of World Records, and makes it second only to the British DOCTOR WHO in the worldwide standings.  At the point that SMALLVILLE will almost be reaching the end of this tenth and final season, it will air episode #214 and thereby earn its place as the new record-holder.  And that is quite an accomplishment for a science fiction show that has fought against great odds to reach this point.

Episode #200 is titled ‘Homecoming’ and it will contain something for everyone, whether you have watched it faithfully for nine years or tuned out after three.  For viewers who may have lost track of the series, returning to watch this episode will be like a homecoming of their own.  Highlights and pictures, after the jump.

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MOVIE REVIEW: Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li – Not The Worst Videogame Movie By Far

You think I’d learn. Every time I check out a movie based on a videogame, I’m let down – sometimes to an extreme [like with Max Payne, DOOM and the original Street Fighter movie]; sometimes by the tiniest of margins. Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li is one of the latter.

streetfighter poster

Here’s a movie that features some of the wittier martial arts choreography to be filmed in the last few years, and there’s a clever – even wistful – parallel father/daughter arc that shows Chun-Li [Kristin Kreuk] to be treasured by her father [Edmund Chen], and Bison’s [Neal McDonough] daughter used solely as a repository for the last of the goodness in his soul.

Unfortunately, the film falls into the usual origin story knee-deep exposition and too little actual martial arts sequences. Performance-wise, the cast is pretty good. Kristin Kreuk is at least adequate as Chun-Li; Robin Shou gives Gen [her mentor] a combination of gravity and humor that works really well; Neal McDonough is suitably psycho as Bison, and the sly chemistry between Interpol agent Nash [Chris Klein] and Bangkok cop Maya [Moon Bloodgood]definitely adds to the mix. Only Michael Clarke Duncan [Balrog, Bison’s number one enforcer] doesn’t fit – more because of the script than Duncan.

Andrzej Bartkowiak’s direction is crisp enough but he simply has too much material to cram into the film’s ninety-six minutes. The result is a movie that does entertain on a basic level, but is missing the kind of pure excitement that it needs to reach the next level.

Final Grade: C+