Tag Archives: Michelle Williams

FX Rounds Out Cast for Fosse/Verdon Limited Series!

Fosse/Verdon – Margaret Qualley will star as Ann Reinking in the FX Limited Series – Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/Courtesy of FilmMagic)

Margaret Qualley and Norbert Leo Butz have signed on as regulars for the FX limited series Fosse/Verdon.

They will play Ann Reinking and Paddy Chayefsky – in the series about the romantic and professional relationship between Bob Fosse (Sam Rockwell) and Gwen Verdon (Michelle Williams).

Several recurring roles have been filled out by Aya Cash, Nate Corddry, Susan Misner, Bianca Marroquin, Kelli Barrett, Evan Handler, Rick Holmes and Paul Reiser.

Fosse/Verdon is slated to premiere in Spring 2019.

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Venom Can’t Decide What Kind of Movie It Should Be!

Venom – Dr. Dan Lewis (Reid Scott), Annie Weying  (Michelle Williams) and Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy)/Photo courtesy of. Columbia Pictures.

I have never wanted to walk out on a Marvel movie – not even the Dolph Lundgren Punisher – but Venom…

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Ridley Scott’s All the Money in the World Coming on Blu-ray!

Ridley Scott’s All the Money in the World – which earned an Oscar® nomination for Christopher Plummer, who replaced Kevin Spacey, and shot his part in next to no time, finishing days before the film’s release – has been released on Digital today, with Blu-ray and DVD releases coming on April 10th.

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Everyone’s Got Their Thing Trailer: Venom!

‘We all have our own problems; our own issues,’ notes Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy), in the first teaser trailer for Marvel’s Venom – as he’s undergoing an MRI.

As he’s mentioning ‘an accident,’ there’s a flash of an alien spacecraft that’s crashed in a wooded area. And what’s that bubbling black stuff in that super-science -looking container?

Venom opens on October 5th – and it’s pretty clear that New Mutants isn’t the only Marvel/Columbia Pictures movie that’s going to lean into the horror arena…

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How Much Money Trailer: All The Money In The World!

The new trailer for All The Money In The World – the story of the kidnapping of 16-year-old John Paul Getty III and the desperate attempt by his devoted mother to convince his billionaire grandfather Jean Paul Getty to pay the ransom – includes scenes with Christopher Plummer, replacing Kevin Spacey, in the role of J. Paul Getty.

All the Money in the World will be in theaters on December 22nd.

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How Much Would You Pay Trailer: All the Money in the World!

The kidnapping of J.Paul Getty’s grandson, John Paul Getty III, was the biggest news story in the world. It became even bigger when the senior Getty answered a reporter’s question, ‘How much would you pay to ransom your grandson if not 17 million?’

All the Money in the World will be in theaters on December 8th.

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Oz The Great and Powerful – Pay No Attention To The Hole In The Middle!

Oz-The-Great-and-Powerful-Michelle-Williams

Pay no attention to the hole in the middle of Oz the Great and Powerful. While much of the film is admirable, James Franco is too hip, too modern and too in on the joke. While the rest of the cast are playing their (mostly thinly developed characters), Franco is winking at the audience and that’s just annoying most of the time.

On the other hand, the film is a magnificent tapestry of visuals and some of the characters work beautifully (Joey King’s China Doll provides the heart; Zach Braff’s Finley provides the real comic relief, and Rachel Weisz’s evil Evanora provides the gusto).

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MOVIE REVIEW: Synecdoche, New York – What Does It All Mean?

It’s been several hours since I walked out of the theater and I’m still wondering whutinthehighholyhellwuzzat?!? If you’ve seen any of the films that Kaufman wrote previously [Being John Malkovich, Adaptation, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind], then you know that is the usual state of mind that follows a screening his work. It’s just that Synecdoche, New York takes things to a whole other level.

synecdochenewyork2

Kaufman lulls us into a state of false comprehension by opening with the family of small time theatre director Caden Cotard [Philip Seymour Hoffman] as they go about a depressing day – a day that seems to last forever and ends with his artist wife, Adele Lack [Catherine Keener] and daughter, Olive [Sadie Goldstein] leaving for a show in Berlin. The two-week separation becomes seventeen years.

In the meantime, Caden, following on the heels of a Broadway success with Death of a salesman, wins a genius grant of quite possibly billions and mounts a play that he hopes will bold and true and a bunch of other artistic stuff. What he winds up with is a scale version of New York – peopled by actors playing all the people in his life [however slightly or parenthetically]. But that’s all window dressing.

Besides being a pun on Schenectady [the Cotards’ hometown], synecdoche is a word that can mean “a part that represents the whole.” In terms of Kaufman’s film, this can mean any number of things – Kaufman himself says that it means what you take out of it. For me, the film is about Life. It grows and shifts in variations on a theme even as members of Caden’s cast quit and are replaced – even though the new actors are doing the same things as their predecessors, they are different because they are different people, much as we are different people at various stages of our lives.

Life, and Death, are both bigger than we are, and smaller. We can be replaced, though never exactly. We can be reproduced, though never exactly, in any number of media. In an odd way, Kaufman seems – to me at least – to be saying that life, the universe and everything is what it is. That can be both a comforting thought and a harrowing one.

Final Grade: A+