Tag Archives: Samantha Morton

SundanceTV Brings BAFTA-Nominated Drama The Last Panthers To America!

Samantha Morton as Naomi
THE LAST PANTHERS – Samantha Morton as Naomi

SundanceTV is bringing The Last Panthers – a crime thriller inspired by the real exploits of the Pink Panther gang – to America. The Last Panthers stars Samantha Morton,  Tahar Rahim, Goran Bogdan and John Hurt.

In the premiere, The Animal (Wednesday, April 13th, 10/9C), a bungled getaway results in a death and the Pink Panthers, long thought dormant, are now the subject of a murder investigation.

Follow the jump for further details.

Continue reading SundanceTV Brings BAFTA-Nominated Drama The Last Panthers To America!

SundanceTV To Co-Produce The Last Panthers!

Samantha Morton Tahar Rahim

SundanceTV has joined crime Series The Last Panthers as co-producer along with Sky Atlantic and CANAL+. The six-part series is inspired by the actions of the notorious Balkans jewel thieves, The Pink Panthers.

The series stars Samantha Morton, Tahar Rahim, Goran Bogdan and John Hurt and is planned for a Spring 2016 premiere. Details follow the jump.

Continue reading SundanceTV To Co-Produce The Last Panthers!

MOVIE REVIEW: Synecdoche, New York – What Does It All Mean?

It’s been several hours since I walked out of the theater and I’m still wondering whutinthehighholyhellwuzzat?!? If you’ve seen any of the films that Kaufman wrote previously [Being John Malkovich, Adaptation, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind], then you know that is the usual state of mind that follows a screening his work. It’s just that Synecdoche, New York takes things to a whole other level.

synecdochenewyork2

Kaufman lulls us into a state of false comprehension by opening with the family of small time theatre director Caden Cotard [Philip Seymour Hoffman] as they go about a depressing day – a day that seems to last forever and ends with his artist wife, Adele Lack [Catherine Keener] and daughter, Olive [Sadie Goldstein] leaving for a show in Berlin. The two-week separation becomes seventeen years.

In the meantime, Caden, following on the heels of a Broadway success with Death of a salesman, wins a genius grant of quite possibly billions and mounts a play that he hopes will bold and true and a bunch of other artistic stuff. What he winds up with is a scale version of New York – peopled by actors playing all the people in his life [however slightly or parenthetically]. But that’s all window dressing.

Besides being a pun on Schenectady [the Cotards’ hometown], synecdoche is a word that can mean “a part that represents the whole.” In terms of Kaufman’s film, this can mean any number of things – Kaufman himself says that it means what you take out of it. For me, the film is about Life. It grows and shifts in variations on a theme even as members of Caden’s cast quit and are replaced – even though the new actors are doing the same things as their predecessors, they are different because they are different people, much as we are different people at various stages of our lives.

Life, and Death, are both bigger than we are, and smaller. We can be replaced, though never exactly. We can be reproduced, though never exactly, in any number of media. In an odd way, Kaufman seems – to me at least – to be saying that life, the universe and everything is what it is. That can be both a comforting thought and a harrowing one.

Final Grade: A+