Tag Archives: Rosemarie DeWitt

The Key To Good Parenting Trailer: Black Mirror!

Black Mirror: Arkangel – Rosemarie DeWitt, Aniya Hodge – Photo by Christos Kalohoridis/Courtesy of Netflix.

Directed by Jodie Foster, Arkangel follows a desperate mom who has had a scare when her disappears briefly.

She decides to have her daughter go through a procedure that will ensure that that won’t happen again.

Black Mirror: Season 4 premieres on Netflix in 2018.

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Spooky Remake Trailer: Poltergeist!

Poltergeist 2

With the remake being helmed by the guy who did Monster House, Gil Kenan, and produced by Sam ‘Evil Dead’ Raimi, I’m expecting great things from 20th Century Fox’s Poltergeist.

Check out the first TV spot for the remake after the jump. Poltergeist opens on May 22nd.

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It’s He-e-e-re! The Poltergeist Trailer!

Poltergeist

The Poltergeist remake looks a lot scarier than the original – at least, judging by the trailer. It also has a terrific cast that includes Sam Rockwell, Rosemarie DeWitt and Jared Harris.

Poltergeist opens July 24th. Check out the trailer after the jump.

Continue reading It’s He-e-e-re! The Poltergeist Trailer!

Exploratory Trailer: Men, Women & Children!

MWC

Thanks to ever growing technology, we are more connected to the world than ever before – but we seem to know less and less about the people we know. That’s the subject of Chad Kultgen’s novel, Men, Women & Children, which been adapted for film by Jason Reitman (Up In The Air, Juno). Men, Women & Children’s first trailer has just gone live and it’s both poignant and intriguing.

Check it out after the jump. Men, Women & Children has its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.

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DVD: United States of Tara: The Second Season – Things Get Weirder!

 

United States of Tara made quite a splash for Showtime when it premiered. It was [and is] the first television series to be built around a character who suffers from Dissociative Identity Disorder [formerly known as Multiple Personality Disorder]. While the Diablo Cody-created series is quirky fun in its original weekly format, the storytelling seems even stronger when viewed on DVD – and if you thought the show was different during season one, well, it gets really weird in season two!

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TELEVISION: The United States of Tara Takes a Unique Approach to Dissociative Identity Disorder!

Tara Gregson [Toni Collette] is a struggling artist/designer with a charming husband, Max [John Corbett] and two kids – studious Marshall [Kier Gilchrist] and uber-brat Kate [Brie Larson]. She also has three more personalities [slutty teen, T; macho redneck Buck, and super Betty Crocker, Alice – and a sister, Charmaine [Rosemarie DeWitt] who thinks she’s faking [“that’s not even a real disease,” she tells Max after an early incident]. Fortunately, Max is a little more open minded than she is – though the exchange does basically set up two schools of thought on DID. The United States of Tara [Showtime, Sundays, 10/9C] is yet another reason that Showtime is sometimes referred to as “the new HBO.”

tara

UST was created by Steven Spielberg and developed by Diablo Cody – which as likely a combination as Juno and Paulie from Cody’s first film, and turns out to be as an unexpectedly good one. It takes a lot of nerve to tackle DID in the manner of UST – the premise is that Tara has gone of her meds with the approval of her family and therapist in the hope that the appearance and behaviour of her alter-egos might lead to the discovery of the events that led her to develop them in the first place. Not the simplest premise, and one that probably be watched closely by mental health professionals and families of DID victims.

From the moment we meet each of Tara’s “alters,” it becomes apparent that Cody is playing for keeps. There moments with each alter that reach almost profound levels of accuracy – and the humor that arises from these situations ranges from dark to light to dark again. In most instances, the humor is used to relieve the impact of the drama, as when Alice takes umbrage with Kate’s attitude and language in the third ep, Aftermath [in which the family attempts to clean up after the damage T and Buck caused in the first two eps.

The United States of Tara is not an easy show to watch, but despite it flaws [the children are woefully underdeveloped and it’s a tribute to Gilchrist and Larson that they have any presence at all], it is smart and refuses to take it easy on its audience. There are moments that are genuinely raw – that will definitely have an impact on you – and moments that leave you rolling with laughter [and you might feel guilty only about half the time].

The United States of Tara will make you think and feel – and isn’t that what the best television should do?

Final Grade: B+