Tag Archives: Live Television

E! Offering Over 7 Hours of 2011 Oscar Coverage

All eyes are on Hollywood when E! goes LIVE from the 2011 Academy Awards with over seven hours of Red Carpet coverage from the industry’s most prestigious night of the year.  In a year full of remarkable movies and outstanding performances, this year’s Oscars will make history when ten nominated films go for the gold, honoring the movies that millions of moviegoers flocked to see in the theaters to make 2010 one of the highest grossing years in film. Now on the eve of the Oscars, entertainment enthusiasts from around the globe prepare to tune in to E! for more than seven hours of LIVE red carpet coverage surrounding the awards. Hosts Ryan Seacrest and Giuliana Rancic, along with E!’s team of award show correspondents and 18 dedicated cameras, including one in the Goodyear Blimp, will be positioned all along the red carpet to give the world an extensive insider’s look at this year’s Oscars.  From all the pre-show preparations, to the glamorous celebrity arrivals and exclusive after-parties, every star-studded moment will be featured in E!’s unparalleled coverage of the 83rd Annual Academy Awards starting Sunday, February 27 at 11:00am PT / 2:00pm ET.

“Countdown to the Red Carpet: The 2011 Academy Awards” — 11:00am to 3:00pm PT / 2:00pm to 6:00pm ET (live to both coasts)

“Live From the Red Carpet: The 2011 Academy Awards” — 3:00 to 5:00pm PT / 6:00 to 8:00pm ET (live to both coasts)

“E! After Party: The 2011 Academy Awards” — 9:00 to 10:30pm PT / 12:00 to 1:30am ET (live to both coasts)

“Fashion Police: The 2011 Academy Awards” — Premieres Monday, March 8 at 10:00pm PT/ET. 

NBC-Universal was kind enough to provide us with all the details on these events.  Click below for the specifics.

Continue reading E! Offering Over 7 Hours of 2011 Oscar Coverage

DVD REVIEW: Studio One Anthology: Amazing Programming From the Dawn of the Television Age

Beginning in 1948 and boasting a nine year run – and over four hundred and fifty episodes – Studio One was the premiere anthology series in a time when live television drama was brand new. Every week, brought a new story – and the multitude of other anthology series that followed were equally productive. To stay the best, a network had to have an imaginative writing and production staff producing its shows – and they had to let them work with an absolute minimum of interference. The series accumulated eighteen Emmy Award nominations and five wins during its run.

Studio One Box Art

The Studio One Anthology DVD set features seventeen of the series best and most influential episodes – beginning with an opera called The Medium and an adaptation of Wuthering Heights. In between are works by writers like Gore Vidal and Rod Serling, and performances by stars like Art Carney, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Charlton Heston, Jack Lemmon and Sal Mineo.

The Medium is the tale of a phoney medium who comes unravelled when a real spirit appears at one of her séances – a spirit that we actually see, as well. Although I’ve never enjoyed the opera, this one is pretty involving.

Several episodes included here went on to becomes award-winning movies: 12 Angry Men [here starring Robert Cummings and Franchot Tone], Julius Caesar [here starring Theodore Bikel as the ill-fated emperor], and Dino [starring Sal Mineo as the title character]. Each of these productions stand out as quality entertainment, especially when you consider that each had a mere two weeks of prep time – and that included writing the scripts! The four episodes mentioned are among my personal favorites, along with: The Death and Life of Larry Benson [a soldier seemingly returns home to his family and featuring one of Lee Remick’s earliest appearances]; June Moon [an adaptation of the Ring Lardner satire, starring Jack Lemmon and Eva Marie Saint], and Wuthering Heights [starring Charlton Heston and Lloyd Bochner].

Because these dramas were broadcast live, with no chance of a rerun, they were filmed from an actual TV screen to be broadcast to the west later the same day. This produced what are called kinescopes, and it is from those kinescopes that this anthology was produced. Needless to say, the quality isn’t as high as it could be. The episodes are still among the best and most memorable work ever produced for television.

Features include: Paley Center Panel Discussion [1987]; Studio One Historical Overview; Paul Nickell Interview Excerpts, Voices from the Archive: Studio One, and a fifty-two page booklet with production details, casts and synopses.

Grade: Studio One: Anthology – A

Grade: Features – B-

Final Grade: A-