Tag Archives: Ken Leung

TELEVISION: Lost: You’re Gonna Love Jughead!

Well, sir… Lost [ABC, Wednesdays, 9/8C] is continuing on its roll!

Richard & Daniel

Among other things, we learn that Locke [Terry O’Quinn] was born in March of 1956 – and that ties into Charles Widmore [Alan Dale] in a supremely unexpected manner. It also figures in explaining why Locke was visited by Richard Alpert [Nestor Carbonell] as a child. The more you learn about this show – the more answers you get – the more questions arise.

Take Faraday’s mother… please! If you can find her… And just wait until you meet a certain member of Desmond’s family! And speaking of Faraday [Jeremy Davies], he gets to make a definitive statement – though not about the physics of the island [though he also gets to do some actual science stuff, too].

Latin. The dead language plays a role here, too. A small but pivotal part.

Locke’s tracking skills get a workout [see 1956]. We learn more about Faraday’s past [he seems like he’s come a long way from then, but with this show you never know]. Miles [Ken Leung] gets to use his special talent, though it doesn’t seem to help much. As for Charlotte [Rebecca Mader], I refer you back to her nosebleed in the season premiere. We even get a scene that suggests that Charles Widmore actually does care about his daughter, Penny [Sonya Walger]. Then there’s Charlie…

After screening three episodes of Lost, Season Five, I have to say that the pieces of the Cuse/Lindelof mosaic really are falling into place. As the season moves inexorably, but nimbly, towards its conclusion, you can kinda see the outlines within the Big Picture falling into place. Because You Left, The Lie and now, Jughead are all extremely well put together episodes. The scripts have been tight, well-paced and feature that odd mix of character and mythology that differentiates Lost from everything else on television. The direction has been, if anything, even crisper than in the past – these eps haven’t played like the three hours they’ve taken up in our schedules.

Finally, the cast of Lost continues to make us believe in these characters – all of whom are lost in one way or another and seeking to find themselves. It’s really only because of the well-developed characters that we can believe in the mythology of the show. If we didn’t care about Locke, we wouldn’t have been so worried when he faced the Smoke Monster in Season One. If we didn’t care about Faraday and Charlotte [and isn’t amazing how quickly we’ve taken to them?], we wouldn’t be worried about that nosebleed.

As long as the characters remain relatable, and the pace of the revelations [answers should soon begin to outnumber questions, judging by this week’s ep], then the show will continue to hold sway over those of us who still watch [whether in real time, or online, or whatever]. Judging by what I’ve seen so far, there’s a lot of fun/drama/weirdness to come.

I can’t wait!

Final Grade: A