Tag Archives: Jennifer Saunders

Sweetie Deadly Darling Trailer: Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie!

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Absolutely Fabulous – Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight

Eddie and Patsy are together again on the big screen for the first time. In their zeal to sign a high profile client for Eddie’s PR firm, they miscalculate gloriously (the only way they ever do anything…). Now they’re on the run – without a single clue as how to do that.

Check out the new international trailer for Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie following the break, sweetie darling! Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie opens on July 22nd.

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Sweetie Darling Trailer: Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie!

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It’s been talked about for so long that it’s practically an urban legend, but Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie has finally happened.The first trailer riffs on every booze ad in the English-speaking world – suggesting that Patsy and Eddie are as too too much as ever.

The whole ever-so-slightly-blitzed gang is back! Check it out after the break. Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie opens on July 1st.

Continue reading Sweetie Darling Trailer: Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie!

MOVIE REVIEW: Coraline – Still Your Best Bet at the Movies!

When it was announced that Henry Selick was developing Nail Gaiman’s wonderful novel Coraline for film, it was probably not something that registered with most moviegoers. If they recognized the name at all, it was most likely from Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas – even Burton claims that all he contributed was the basic plot, lead character and a few hasty sketches. Selick did all the heavy lifting.

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Coraline is a completely different story. Selick developed the film, both writing the screenplay and directing the film. Here, Selick’s genius becomes clear. He adds a character – the odd little boy named Wybie [voiced by Robert Bailey Jr.] – to add to the stakes, and provide a contrasting character for Coraline [Dakota Fanning]. He also makes a few other tweaks that give the film even more depth than that usually given by stop motion animation. Then he adds really excellent 3-D – not as a gimmick, though there are places where an action does pop toward the audience – but as a means of making Coraline’s unique world just that little bit more unsettling.

The story of Coraline is one of misunderstandings: Coraline’s parents [John Hodgman, Teri Hatcher] seem disconnected from her, disinterested – though they are really trying to make a deadline on a freelance job, producing a catalogue for a client; when Coraline finds her other parents, she really thinks they are genuinely interested in her – though she is merely a diversion for them [especially her Other Mother]; Coraline doesn’t understand Wybie, either, thinking him a pest when he’s really a very lonely boy who has no idea about how to make friends.

Her adventures in both worlds involve other minor players who contribute to the mood: Miss pink [Dawn French] and Miss Forcible [Jennifer Saunders] who appear to have been very naughty in their professional careers, and Mr. Bobinski [Ian McShane], who is an aging Russian acrobat who is trying to train mice as circus performers. These characters give the film world a little extra bite and reality.

Then there’s the cat [Keith David], who is the same in both worlds but can talk in the Other World. Gaiman does a smart-ass cat to perfection and Selick captures him just as well in the film [and doesn’t a good fantasy require a smart-ass cat?].

After taking in the boring for 113 minutes/exciting for 5 minutes so-called thriller, The International, it’s my firm recommendation that Coraline is the best film available for the smart movie buff this weekend, acing out the engaging Confessions of a Shopaholic by a nose.

Final Grade: A