Tag Archives: Frank Miller

Dark Horse Announces San Diego Comic-Con 2018 Programming Schedule!

Panels, signings, swag, and a coloring wall… a COLORING WALL (???)… are among the Dark Horse’s plans for Comic-Con International 2018.

Comic Con International 2018 will take place July 19th–22nd at the San Diego Convention Center, in San Diego, CA.

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Frank Miller Returns To World of 300 with Xerxes: The Fall of Darius and the Rise of Alexander!

Xerxes: The Fall of the House of Darius and the Rise of Alexander – Art by Frank Miller/Courtesy of Dark Horse.

Xerxes: The Fall of the House of Darius and the Rise of Alexander follows Persian King Xerxes as he sets out to conquer the world to avenge his father Darius’s defeat and create an empire unlike anything the world has ever seen . . . Until the hardy Greeks produce a god king of their own, Alexander the Great.

Written and drawn by Frank Miller, Xerxes: The Fall of the House of Darius and the Rise of Alexander will be in comics shops on April 4th.

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Dark Horse Celebrates The Hard Goodbye’s 25th Anniversary With Curator’s Collection!

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It’s been 25 years since Dark Horse Comics released Frank Miller’s Sin City: The Hard Goodbye on an unsuspecting world. It was Miller’s first attempt at creating a comic with absolutely no constraints and went on to be considered a seminal entry in comic book noir.

To celebrate this anniversary, Dark Horse has announced Frank Miller’s Sin City: The Hard Goodbye Curator’s Collection, which will published through its Kitchen Sink Imprint in June, 2016.

The curator’s collection will feature the entire series scanned and reprinted full size and unaltered. It will feature an introduction by Robert Rodriguez, an epilogue by publisher Mike Richardson, and a new interview with Miller about his artistic technique. Miller will also be signing an exclusive print of his original cover artwork for Sin City at New York Comic Con on Saturday, October 10, 2015. for further details, follow the jump.

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Here Comes The Big Guy and Rusty The Boy Robot Hardcover!

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Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot are getting the deluxe hardcover treatment from Dark Horse Comics. The series, from Frank Miller and Geof Darrow, recounted the adventures of the giant American robot, Big Guy, and his Japanese-made sidekick, Rusty the Boy Robot – and was so popular it became an animated TV series.

Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot will be released in October but you can preorder now. For details, follow the jump.

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Sin City: A Dame To Kill For – Would-be Mighty, Mega-Noir!

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When Sin City came out, seemingly eons ago, the idea of a film being almost entirely CG was something that hadn’t really been done to such an extent. It was visually groundbreaking, technologically breathtaking, and for fans of film noir, exhilarating. A Dame To Kill for is still visually arresting and mega-noir, but its impact comes more from the performance of Eva Green than anything else.

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Hot Trailer: Sin City: A Dame To Die For!

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Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller return to Sin City for Sin City: A Dame To Kill For. Taken from Miller’s Sin City graphic novels, the sequel to the innovative Sin City boasts a killer cast and, now, a killer trailer. Check it out after the jump.

Sin City: A Dame To Kill For will be in theaters on August 22nd.

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MOVIE REVIEW: The Spirit Made My Toes Curl – But I Kinda Liked It!

In a summer during the early-to-mid sixties, I surreptitiously acquired a copy of a specific issue of Playboy – not for the pictures, though those were nice, but for an essay on The Great Comic Book Heroes, by Jules Feiffer. It was about comic characters from the Golden Age of Comics [approximately 1939-1946 – your mileage may vary]. That led to my acquiring, with a hard-earned seven bucks, for Feiffer’s book of the same title on the subject. Included in the book was an eight-page, full-color Spirit story from the Philadelphia Record Sunday Comics Supplement, dated July 20, 1941. It was about a tale told to a tourist couple by an Egyptian beggar, twice in two days – first as a prophecy, and then as a fait accompli. It was incredible – it had action, wit, humor [even then I knew wit was not the same thing as humor] and amazing art. Well before the Kitchen Sink reprints of the seventies, I was hooked!

The Spirit's Women

In the summer of 1987, the ABC network broadcast the ninety-minute pilot for a projected series based on Will Eisner’s legendary masked hero, The Spirit. It was bright and colorful and really seemed, to me at least, to capture the peculiar mix of whimsy and drama that marked the comic as a unique and brilliant work. Eisner, on the other hand, said it was so bad that “it made my toes curl.”

Today, I saw Frank Miller’s movie adaptation of Will Eisner’s The Spirit. As a critic, I realize that its thin story is told choppily [Frank, buddy, have you never heard of dissolves, transitions and such? And, really Frank! Plaster of Paris? What the hell were you thinking???] and the acting varies from poor to really poor. I get that it’s supposed to be a black comedy; I get that it’s Eisner’s characters and situations as filtered Miller’s sensibilities; I even get that The Octopus [Samuel L. Jackson] is supposed to an evil, human version of Wile E. Coyote/Yosemite Sam, while The Spirit is The Roadrunner/Bugs Bunny.

Somehow, though, I don’t think blending Sin City, Tex Avery and Chuck Jones was really the way to go here. The Spirit is not a character for whom bleached out colors [except, of course, for that blood red tie] really work. Neither should the character be set in such a static, blocky manner. The comics were always more fluid than all but the best films – and certainly more so than any of the comics of the period [and most of the best of today, as well]. And juking The Spirit’s origin in such a manner – turning a tough, determined man into a superhero, when he was really [to quote Douglas Adams, “Just this guy, y’know?”]. The spirit of The Spirit has been pretty much bleached out of the movie.

The Spirit is pretty much a disaster no matter how you look at it – and yet, I enjoyed it. Maybe it’s because of the hard edge Dan Lauria gives Commissioner Dolan, or the resignation Sarah Paulson gives Dr. Ellen Dolan, who knows she’ll never have The Spirit’s heart – at least not exclusively. Part of it is the cinematography. Miller may be a long way from being a film director, but he can compose a shot like nobody’s business! Also, the world of Central City may be CG but it has more heft than Sin City. Plus, there are moments when Eisner’s character peeks through the chaos […and this is for Muffin!”].

Even with the movie’s compositional beauty, a couple decent [not brilliant] performances [Sorry Mr. Gabriel Macht. I know The Spirit, and he’s not a monotoned refugee from a Philip Chandler novel] and amazing CG, I can understand how most critics will give The Spirit the equivalent of an ‘F’. I can’t do that. But tempering my love for the character with what little of that remains here – and combining that with an objective overview of everything that’s wrong with it – I can’t give The Spirit a positive grade [as much as it pains me].

Final Grade: D+