Tag Archives: Eddie Izzard

Inside Look: Playstation’s Powers!

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It was a bit of a shock to learn that Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming’s dark stake on super-powered characters, Powers, had been licensed by Playstation.

Then they cast Sharlto Copley as Christian Walker – a former Power who lost his powers under devastating circumstances and now was a detective investigating Powered crimes. The they cast Eddie Izzard as bad guy Power, Wolfe and changed Walker’s partner, Deena Pilgrim from petite blue-eyed, blonde to African-American because Susan Heyward’s audition was so impressive. Then they added Michelle Forbes as Retro Girl – one of the few genuinely altruistic Powers in the world. Suddenly, the Powers live-action series become a source of much intrigue – intrigue that grew with the release of the first trailer last October.

Now, Sony and Playstation have released the first behind-the-scenes look at the world of Powers – a seven-minute video that features interviews with most of the major players in front of and behind the camera. Check it out after the jump.

Powers premieres on March 10th, with new episodes released on Tuesdays

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Treasure Island Is One Night Movie Event For Syfy!

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic swashbuckler, Treasure Island, comes to Syfy on May 5th as a one night, four-hour special event. The RHI Entertainment production stars Eddie Izzard as Long John Silver, Elijah Wood as Ben Gunn and Donald Sutherland as Flint. Tony Regbo [the Harry Potter films] is young Jim Hawkins.

The official press release follows the jump.

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United States of Tara: Season Three – Left Hanging, But on a Hopeful Note!

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Showtime canceled United States of Tara – the series about the dysfunctional family with the matriarch who suffers from Dissociative Identity Disorder – after seeing its third season ratings plummet. This is a shame because the series was far better than the inexplicably more popular Nurse Jackie. Thus, all though it doesn’t get a proper finale, the show’s third season maintained its high quality and came to a conclusion that had a genuinely hopeful note.

Continue reading United States of Tara: Season Three – Left Hanging, But on a Hopeful Note!

MOVIE REVIEW: IGOR: Inspired Idea – Utterly Inadequate Film!

In the land of Malaria, things have changed since it was a sunny, happy place. Constant cloud cover and rain have ruined it for agriculture, so the king has decreed that the best way to survive is to develop an economy based on the creation of evil science. The country’s best mad scientists compete in an “Evil Science Fair” – and the king charges the rest of the world a [you should pardon the expression] king’s ransom to not use it.

The Triumvarate of Terror

Each mad scientist has an Igor – a hunchbacked assistant to gather materials and pull the power switch to put the finishing touches on their evil experiments. The film is built on the idea that one of these Igors [voiced by John Cusack] wants to be the scientist, not the Igor. When his master, Dr. Glickenstein [John Cleese] dies during the creation of a new weapon, Igor seizes his chance. With the aid [?] of his previous inventions – Scamper [Steve Buscemi], a suicidal immortal rabbit, and Brain [Sean Hayes], a robot with a brain in a jar – he decides to create life.

The idea of an Igor supplanting his mad scientist and succeeding is a good one, so it’s really a shame that this beautifully designed film [looking like some mad hybrid of Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas and a Tex Avery cartoon] is virtually humor-free. Even Jennifer Coolidge’s assortment of scientists’ girlfriends and Eddie Izzard’s unscrupulous Dr. Schadenfreude [who’s won seventeen Fairs by stealing the best efforts of his competitors – and delights in the misery of others] somehow fail to… ummm… come to life.

The animation, from design on, is extremely good, but in light of the paucity of laughs and any real sense of danger, it simply isn’t enough to recommend the film. In short, Igor could’ve used a lot more madness.

Final Grade: D

Movie Reviews: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian – Bigger, Brighter, Bolder… and Better!

Disney’s second Narnia movie is an improvement on the first one. The story is bigger, the colors [both in terms of set and effects design and in terms of performances] are brighter, the storytelling is bolder.

The story involves a race of Adam’s Sons [humans] called the Telmarines, who have conquered Narnia and hunted the Narnians [they think] to extinction. Prince Caspian X [Ben Barnes] is the heir to the throne, but not of age. Instead, the kingdom is ruled by his Uncle, Miraz [Sergio Castellito] – at least until his aunt births a son. Then Miraz sends men to kill his nephew so that he can begin his own line of royalty. His tutor helps him flee and gives him an ivory horn to blow only as a last resort.

Ready for war

In a London subway station, the Pevensie children are about to take a train to school when the station falls apart around them, leaving them standing in Narnia – but not the Narnia they knew – Caspian has blown the horn. While they’ve been home for a year, Narnia has passed through 1300 years! Now, they must help Caspian regain his kingdom and save the denizens of Narnia.

One of the reasons that Prince Caspian works so well is that the creative team [writers Stephen McFeely, Christopher Markus and Andrew Adamson, who also directed] took the key elements of the story and built an epic tale around them without feeling the need to be slavish in their adaptation. Another reason is that the four actors who play the Pevensies [Georgie Henley, Skander Keynes, Anna Popplewell and William Moseley] are quite brilliant [which marks a drastic change for Popplewell and Moseley, who were pretty wooden in the first film]. Ben Barnes does a nice job as Caspian, who came off as whiny and a bit of a wimp in the book but comes across as a bit naive but brave here.

Once again, the supporting cast is also first-rate. Peter Dinklage stands out as Trumpkin, a somewhat acerbic dwarf whom Lucy [Henley] describes as her “dear little friend.” [“That’s very patronizing,” he snorts]. Then there’s the mouse warrior, Reepicheep, voiced by Eddie Izzard – who is a bit put off by his foes’ lack of imagination [“Yes, I’m a mouse. Can’t you think of something more original?”].

So, the script and the performances are first-rate. But what about the effects? They’re also pretty stellar. Whether we’re talking the denizens of Narnia [a talking badger among them], or a spectacular creature who appears near the end, the effects are both first-rate and completely in service to the story.

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian is hit – a palpable hit!

Final Grade: A+