Tag Archives: Alice Braga

USA Network Orders Queen of the South Telenovela To Series!

Alice Braga

USA Network has ordered thirteen episodes of the drama series  Queen of the South – a telenovela based on the literary novel La Reina Del Sur, by Arturo Pérez-Reverte, which also yielded a Telemundo series that became one of the most popular telenovelas of all time for that network.

The series stars Alice Braga as Teresa Mendoza who has to flee when her drug dealing boyfriend is killed in Mexico – and has to team up with someone from her past to take down the leader of the cartel that is pursuing her.

The series is slated to premiere in 2016. Further details follow the jump.

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Redbelt: David Mamet’s Martial Arts Film Stings Like a Butterfly, Floats Like a Bee!

redbelt3

David Mamet has studied Brazilian Jiu-jitsu for several years and, with Redbelt, he brings this side of his life to silver screen in a story that features his usual briskly vulgar language and crosses, double-crosses and scams – only in the staging of a martial arts movie.

The protagonist, Mike Terry [Chiwetal Ejiofor], is an instructor/studio owner whose business is suffering and really only survives because of the income provided by his wife, Sondra’s [Alice Braga] boutique garment business. When he comes to the aid of a movie star, Chet Frank [Tim Allen], in a bar fight, he winds up getting sucked into a series of cons that result in his finally having to enter a mixed martial arts tournament to save his studio and his wife’s business – and that doesn’t even take into account the messed up lady lawyer and an unfortunate accident…

With Redbelt, Mamet does a better job as director than as writer. Sure, we’ve got the typical Mamet wheels-within-wheels series of scams/cons and double-crosses – and the film plays to the idea of purity of mind in martial arts versus the crass commercialism of professional mixed martial arts. Unfortunately, after giving us some extremely good set-up, Mamet allows the film to fall onto a kind of clichéd physical battle between Terry and the man behind the tournament – with the master of his art in attendance, no less. The film could easily have ended before the final scene, though. That was a bit too much.

Overall, though, Redbelt is better-than-average Mamet [which is better than most writer/directors best]. He gets fine performances from his cast [many of whom, like Mantegna, Rebecca Pidgeon and David Paymer] are part of his repertory company. He balances the dialogue and action masterfully, and has a knack for making the most of his small budget. Some mixed martial arts fans in the row behind me said “Awesome!” more than once during the movie, so I guess the fight sequences were as good as they seemed. Redbelt is one of Mamet’s lesser works, but it’s certainly worth checking out – even for those who don’t really care about martial arts.

Final Grade: B-