Category Archives: Television

TELEVISION: Extreme Sports Star Saved By Mascot Costume!

rob-dyrdek

Extreme sports star Rob Dyrdek has been working on a series of promotional videos for the Carl’s Jr. fast food chain. Apparently, not all of his stunts – performed in the Happy Star mascot costume – have gone as planned. Follow the link to see Happy Star save Dyrdek’s life:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24UmHjbrgnU

Television: Robert Buckley Joins The CW’s Privileged

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Don’t forget to check out Privileged on Tuesday February 10th at 9PM EST when sexy Robert Buckley joins the cast!  

Buckley, who was most recently seen as Kirby Atwood in the now canceled Lipstick Jungle will be joining Joanna Garcia who stars a Megan Smith, a Yale-educated journalism major who reluctantly becomes a live-in tutor for two spoiled grand-daughters of a Palm Beach cosmetics business magnate.

Check out the interview below with Robert Buckley courtesy of The CW.

And speaking of Privileged, check out the cool interview with Brian Hallisay who plays Will Davis.

Television: Sneak Peeks for The Mentalist Episode “Crimson Casanova”

Is he just that into them??  When a wealthy married woman is murdered during a romantic rendezvous at a country club, suspicion turns to her lover – an unlikely ladies’ man who prides himself on his seduction techniques, much to the amusement of Jane (Simon Baker) and the puzzlement of Rigsby (Owain Yeoman).  Guest starring Elon Gold (Stacked) as “Fricke,” Melinda Page Hamilton (Mad Men, The Closer) as “Katie” and Alona Tal (Supernatural, Veronica Mars) as “Natalie.”    “Crimson Casanova” was written by Ken Woodruff and was directed by Lesli Linka Glatter.

Crimson Casanova will air on Tues., 2/10 at 9:00 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.  Below are two sneak peaks of the episode provided courtesy of Warner Brothers Television.

 

Television: The CW’s 90210 Gets A New Bad Boy

90210

There’s a new bad boy on hit CW Network series 90210 starting Tuesday February 10th!  Matt Lanter guest stars in an episode titled ‘Of heartbreaks and Hotels’. Lanter’s character of  Liam who is being touted as the Dylan McKay (Luke Perry) for the new generation, is a mysterious guy who begins working at the hotel where Naomi (AnnaLynne McCord) is currently living.  Sparks begin to fly when Naomi is immediately intrigued by  the handsome and mysterious Liam. 

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Matt Lanter in no stranger to television audiences. In 2006 he won the role of Brody Mitchum on the hit NBC series Heroes where he played opposite Hayden Panettiere’s character, Claire Bennett.  He has also had guest roles on Shark, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Grey’s Anatomy and Monk. Lanter was also the voice of Anakin Skywalker in the big screen animated Star Wars movie ‘Attack of the Clones’ and has continued to voice the character in the hit animated TV series.

90210 airs on the CW network on Tuesday nights at 8PM EST with encore showings on Wednesday nights at 9PM EST.

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HOLLYWOOD INSIDER: Burn Notice’s Gabrielle Anwar Talks Guns and That Whole Michael & Fiona Thing!

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As the stunning [in more ways than one] and deadly Fiona in USA’s Burn Notice, Gabrielle Anwar finds herself playing a character whose first response to problems is to shoot them, or blow them up. During a teleconference call earlier today, she got a chance to talk about Fiona’s penchant for violence and… shall we say unusual… relationship with burnt spy, Michael Weston [Jeffrey Donovan].

Continue reading HOLLYWOOD INSIDER: Burn Notice’s Gabrielle Anwar Talks Guns and That Whole Michael & Fiona Thing!

TELEVISION REVIEW: American Idol Season Eight So Far… Ish.. Michelle’s Take

TELEVISION REVIEW: American Idol Season Eight So Far.... Ish.

TELEVISION REVIEW: American Idol Season Eight So Far.... Ish.

It’s official, being a critic requires you to be a closet masochist or is it sadist? I always get confused. Whatever the correct word is, I apparently love to punish myself by watching crap that I know is, um… Crap, that I really hate, but can’t seem to turn my eyes away from, especially if it’s free and as easy as sitting on my butt and shutting my brain down. I have tremendous will power when it comes to avoiding garbage movies because it requires a LOT of effort to actually go out to a screening or even see a film on opening day. Ok, not a LOT of effort, but it certainly costs money.   But that’s not the case with television, just turn it on, and it’s there in the background while you are doing something else. This is the secret of American Idol’s success. Returning for an 8th season with a brand new fourth judge, Kara DioGuardi who adds absolutely NOTHING to the proceedings. It seems like the Producers hired her as a big F.U. to everyone’s favorite drunk, Paula Abdul.

After 7 seasons and hundreds of thousands of auditions, maybe it’s time for the Producers and fans of American Idol to come to the conclusion, that just maybe, maybe, there really is a very limited pool of talented singers that can be found and Idol has just about reached that nexus. I mean the people that they have put through this season would never have gotten through in previous years.  There was the bikini girl from a few weeks ago, there’s the weird Spanish girl and the goofy guy with the hair this week, then the producers have some weird fetish for 16 year olds – girl or guy. And they always have. If you are between the age of 15 – 17, have some poise and can sing barely ok, you are almost guaranteed a spot.  I think this is the first season that I’ve actually watched past the 3rd episode, generally, I watch the first 2 episodes and then lose interest until they get down to the top 15. It’s hard to get attached to any of these no-talent, no-body, wannabes.  They spend way too much time on the bad singers, doing the lame profiles when you know they are going to end up blowing.  Then after spending an hour watching all of these dreck singers, we find out, oh by the way “20 people got tickets to Hollywood.”   Yes the bad singers are funny, in moderation, and this year the judges aren’t as cruel as they have been in the past.  So if they aren’t going to be cruel, what’s the point of making the audience suffer?   All four judges still come across as those annoying “hipster,” kids who think they are too cool for the room and are the gatekeepers to your entry into the cool kids table.

Again, this is when I say Kara adds nothing to the proceedings, other than Paula has been almost too quiet this year. It’s been primarily the Randy and Simon show. In the last installment Kara tried to show some personality and argue with Simon, but it seemed forced and scripted and there’s been no disagreements at all. There are four judges, so they never explained what would happen if it’s a split decision. Of course that hasn’t happened this season since all four seemed to agree on everything. I have no hope that this year’s Idol will be any good, at least talent wise, but it’s a free train wreck, and while I say I won’t watch again until they get down to the top 15. I am curious to see what exactly happens during Hollywood week.

Television: Supernatural Fandom Mourns the Loss of Executive Producer/Director Kim Manners

Monday January 26, 2009

In the early morning hours it began circulating as a rumor on German Supernatural discussion forums. By Mid afternoon it was confirmed as fact by a posting Supernatural actor Jim Beaver made on his Myspace Page.

“Jim is in mourning for one of the best friends and best directors he’s ever known–Kim Manners, who died last night from lung cancer.”

Then came this statement from the Publicist for Supernatural confirming the passing of Kim Manners:

“Supernatural” executive producer & director Kim Manners passed away last night in Los Angeles, following a battle with cancer.

Then a statement from Creator and Executive Producer Eric Kripke:

“Everyone at ‘Supernatural’ is walking around in a daze, shocked and absolutely devastated.  Kim was a brilliant director; more than that, he was a mentor and friend.  He was one of the patriarchs of the family, and we miss him desperately.  He gave so much to ‘Supernatural,’ and everything we do on the show, now and forever, is in memory of him.

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The soft spoken Kim Manners had been with Supernatural since the first season coming in as director of the season one’s 4th episode, “Dead in the Water”. Even though Manners went on to become an executive producer of the hit series, which stars Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles as demon fighting, monster hunting brothers Sam and Dean Winchester, he continued to direct up until his illness hospitalized him in December of 2008. His last listed episodes as director is the season 4 episodes “Lazarus Rising” and his final one, “Metamorphosis”.

Continue reading Television: Supernatural Fandom Mourns the Loss of Executive Producer/Director Kim Manners

TELEVISION: Lost: You’re Gonna Love Jughead!

Well, sir… Lost [ABC, Wednesdays, 9/8C] is continuing on its roll!

Richard & Daniel

Among other things, we learn that Locke [Terry O’Quinn] was born in March of 1956 – and that ties into Charles Widmore [Alan Dale] in a supremely unexpected manner. It also figures in explaining why Locke was visited by Richard Alpert [Nestor Carbonell] as a child. The more you learn about this show – the more answers you get – the more questions arise.

Take Faraday’s mother… please! If you can find her… And just wait until you meet a certain member of Desmond’s family! And speaking of Faraday [Jeremy Davies], he gets to make a definitive statement – though not about the physics of the island [though he also gets to do some actual science stuff, too].

Latin. The dead language plays a role here, too. A small but pivotal part.

Locke’s tracking skills get a workout [see 1956]. We learn more about Faraday’s past [he seems like he’s come a long way from then, but with this show you never know]. Miles [Ken Leung] gets to use his special talent, though it doesn’t seem to help much. As for Charlotte [Rebecca Mader], I refer you back to her nosebleed in the season premiere. We even get a scene that suggests that Charles Widmore actually does care about his daughter, Penny [Sonya Walger]. Then there’s Charlie…

After screening three episodes of Lost, Season Five, I have to say that the pieces of the Cuse/Lindelof mosaic really are falling into place. As the season moves inexorably, but nimbly, towards its conclusion, you can kinda see the outlines within the Big Picture falling into place. Because You Left, The Lie and now, Jughead are all extremely well put together episodes. The scripts have been tight, well-paced and feature that odd mix of character and mythology that differentiates Lost from everything else on television. The direction has been, if anything, even crisper than in the past – these eps haven’t played like the three hours they’ve taken up in our schedules.

Finally, the cast of Lost continues to make us believe in these characters – all of whom are lost in one way or another and seeking to find themselves. It’s really only because of the well-developed characters that we can believe in the mythology of the show. If we didn’t care about Locke, we wouldn’t have been so worried when he faced the Smoke Monster in Season One. If we didn’t care about Faraday and Charlotte [and isn’t amazing how quickly we’ve taken to them?], we wouldn’t be worried about that nosebleed.

As long as the characters remain relatable, and the pace of the revelations [answers should soon begin to outnumber questions, judging by this week’s ep], then the show will continue to hold sway over those of us who still watch [whether in real time, or online, or whatever]. Judging by what I’ve seen so far, there’s a lot of fun/drama/weirdness to come.

I can’t wait!

Final Grade: A

TELEVISION: The Closer: Suicide Is Painless – But Was This Suicide?

The winter premiere of The Closer [Mondays, TNT, 9/8C] is following a pretty hard act – it’s mid-season cliffhanger, and so we both learn the fate of Detective Sanchez [Raymond Cruz] and witness Deputy Chief Brenda Lee Johnson’s [Kyra Sedgwick] reaction to Fritz’s marriage ultimatum. Even better, there’s an apparent case of suicide that coroner Dr. Morales [Jonathan Del Arco] won’t sign off on – and he’s extorting Deputy Chief Johnson into taking the case [or he’ll take it to another division, making her team look like idiots!].

Tenney, Sternhagen, Sedgwick

The deceased is a recovering drug addict and con man who seems to have gone straight – though that doesn’t jive with the recollection of his ex-wife which is, in turns at odds with the experience [or at least testimony] of his pastor [church in a slating rink!] and cancer-suffering girlfriend. Add in the after effects of the cliff-hanger’s two-pronged dilemma – and the presence of Brenda’s parents [Barry Corbin and Frances Sternhagen], who are visiting for a few days before setting out on a Hawaiian cruise – and you’ve got all the ingredients for a truly odd mix of confusion, misdirection and pathos. The episode, Good Faith, is also notable for actually having scenes that do not require the presence of DC Strong.

Upcoming episodes feature a body found in the trunk of a car, and a suspected rapist/murderer whose lawyer has a track record of successfully defending sex offenders.

As usual, The Closer is written well enough to give us a few moments pause over each ep’s mystery, but it remains most notable for giving us a strong lead character that continues to grow as a person – and as a high-ranking member of the Los Angeles Police Department. Though this is Sedgwick’s show, there are moments for several members of her team as well as J.K. Simmons’ Assistant Chief Pope [who gets some really good stuff in the premiere].

All in all, The Closer hasn’t yet lost a step. It remains one of the best [and most watched] programs on cable television.

Final Grade: B

TELVISION: Trust Me: TNT’s Workplace Dramedy Shows Promise!

When Trust Me [Mondays, TNT, 10/9C] premieres following The Closer, there will be a tonal shift of some magnitude. Whereas The Closer is a darker drama with humor, Trust Me is much lighter in tone, with a nearly equal amount of each.

McCormack, Cavanagh

The set up is this: Mason [Eric McCormack] and Conner [Tom Cavanagh] are partners in a creative group for ad agency Rothman, Green & Mohr. Mason is a bit uptight, a bit square and a draughtsman as opposed to an artist. Conner is sly, charming, talented but incredibly immature – and us brilliant at coming up with concepts and taglines.

When one of their biggest clients, Arc Mobile, wants to change their approach, Mason and Conner are pulled away from a cushy assignment to come up with something new – only their boss [Life on Mars’ Jason O’Mara] hasn’t been told. When he finds out, he retreats to his office and has a heart attack. The group’s creative director, Tony Mink [Griffin Dunne] promotes Mason to take his place. Conner has a fit of pique.

Trust Me’s first two episodes [Before and After, All Hell The Victors] deal with the ramifications of the client’s need for change and the fall out form Mason’s promotion – working a newly hired hot shot writer, Sarah Krajicek-Hunter [Monica Potter] who was promised “a window;” two junior copywriters, Tom [Mike Damus] and Hector [Geoffrey Arend] who think taglines are passé, and Mason’s wife Erin [Sarah Clarke] into the mix, along with all their unique arcs.

Between dealing with Arc Mobile and the inadvertent plagiarizing of a tagline from a potential employee, the first two episodes do a good job of setting up the characters and situations that will be the foundation for the series. If the ad agency stuff feels real it’s because series creators, Hunt Baldwin and John Coveny have between them over twenty years experience in the field.

Trust Me wouldn’t be out of place on a major network [or on the “Characters Welcome” cable net, for that matter]. It’s hugely entertaining despite still needing a bit of work on the drama/humor balance and figuring out how to maximum effect out of its minor characters. It’s certainly a better than average series, but it has the potential to be much more.

Final Grade: B-